Future of HdM's Paris Tower Uncertain

John Hill
21. November 2014
Image: Herzog & de Meuron

After Paris's city council narrowly rejected Herzog & de Meuron's proposed 42-story Triangle Tower for the city's Porte de Versailles area, Mayor Anne Hidalgo decried the vote as invalid and is calling for a second one.

Ever since Parisians' lukewarm reception of the 59-story Montparnasse Tower completed in 1973, towers have been relegated to La Défense, the large business district west of the city. So it's no shock that the 180-meter (590-foot) Triangle Tower is finding many opponents, primarily those who feel another tower would mar the city's 19th century low-rise skyline. Proponents, on the other hand, cite the 5,000 construction jobs that would be created as well as the companies that would be drawn to the tower's marquee office space. Hidalgo's predecessor, Bertrand Delanoe, proposed an end to the 37-meter (121-foot) limit in parts of the capital, opening the door for Herzog & de Meuron and developer Unibail-Rodamco.

With these arguments for and against, the tower was rejected by only 5 votes, 78 to 83, when the city council's secret ballot concluded on Monday. Yet, as the New York Times states, "the winners made the mistake of brandishing their 'no' ballots, making public what was supposed to be a private poll – and giving Ms. Hidalgo an opening to bring the whole matter to court." We will update with the result if and when the second, public vote takes place.

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