A Short Survey of Architectural Publishing

John Hill | 05.06.2013
What is the state of architectural publishing today? How, if at all, are publishers responding to the changes to reading brought on by digital technologies, such as E-books and E-readers? These and other questions are the focus of our Short Survey of Architectural Publishing, in which we asked publishers of books on architecture a series of questions about publishing, technology, and the books they produce.

Gestalten


Berlin
Founded 1995
Q&A with Sven Ehmann, Creative Director

Why do you publish architecture books? What is your goal with publishing books on architecture?
 
A few years ago, Gestalten was mainly known for its books on graphic design, illustration, and typography, but we have expanded that profile over time along the interests of our readers. Now, our books are exploring contemporary visual culture in the broadest sense and architecture clearly plays a key role in that mix. On the one hand, architects were reading our other books and started approaching us so we naturally grew into that field and market. On the other, readers from other creative disciplines were increasingly experimenting with spaces and installations or started collaborating with architects on projects. Against that background, getting more and more involved as a publisher here made perfect sense.
 
I would say there are two main audiences for architecture books. The first is made up of professional architects, planners, interior designers, and their clients who, despite the rise of digital media, are a very passionate and loyal book audience. The second is a general public with a sense of aesthetics and an interest in design and the art of living. Both of these groups use our books for inspiration and, I assume, as a kind of shortcut to a curated selection of excellent projects.

What are the differences between publishing architectural and other types of books?
 
The professional readers of architecture books are sophisticated and have high expectations in terms of the way projects are presented. While a single image might be enough to tell a story in other publications, our architecture titles involve more images and also plans, sections, and drawings. I had the pleasure to work on a redesign for the Italian magazine Domus a couple of years ago and that helped teach me what it takes to tell a visual story about architecture in the right way. In the end, these books should not just be about landmark facades, but they should also provide almost a walk-through experience plus background information on the architects as well as particular challenges, unique solutions, and materials in the building process. 
 
How do you see the current state of affairs in architectural publishing?
 
The market for books as a whole currently faces a lot of challenges and that means challenges for publishers in the field of architecture, arts, and design as well as anyone else. But these challenge are not just threatening existing market positions. I feel that, even more, they are giving us the opportunity to move forward and embrace all other media formats to do what we do best: explore visual culture and tell the stories of that culture in interesting, useful, and surprising ways. We believe that our audience will see enough value in that to also pay for this content.
 
Another great opportunity for us is working more closely not only with architects, but also with builders and construction companies to make sure that their documentations and presentations are produced are tell a good story in the right way - in both conventional as well as digital media. In that sense, Gestalten can also become a mediator or communication consultant, production partner, and service provider.
 
What are you doing to address the changes to book publishing brought on by digital technologies?
 
Despite the fact that the book industry is a rather conservative environment, our business has already been highly digital for years. The only thing missing so far is the right formats and products to also turn our content into a viable digital business as well. We put a lot of energy into our websites: We produce and provide news, we run different shops for digital and analog products, we have produced and distributed over 100 video podcasts about creatives from around the world. We also have a team working on the communication of Gestalten across all channels including social media. In addition, we have been testing digital book formats for a while. I truly think that, these days, we are closer to a digital media company than to a traditional niche publisher.
What are your top architecture titles in terms of sales and popularity?
 
We started out with a very visual book called Spacecraft. This title not only introduced us onto the market for architecture books, but it was also so successful that we did a follow-up called Spacecraft 2 and have continued to publish a series of titles whose emphasis is very visual. In the meantime, there have also been a variety of other projects exploring different facets of contemporary architecture such as Container Atlas. At the moment, our title Rock the Shack on small buildings in non-urban settings is doing very well. We also recently did a book on branded architecture called Brand Spaces, which got very positive response. 
 
 
What are new architecture titles you're most excited about, particularly ones that may be dealing with shifts in publishing?
 
We are currently finishing a title on new approaches to work environments and this is going to be a book filled with in-depth information, copious images, plans, and sections. So I am really looking forward to it coming out this fall. We are also working on some more architect monographs, which should also give us space for some experimentation.

 

GG - Editorial Gustavo Gili


Barcelona
Founded 1902
Q&A with Moisés Puente, Editor

Why do you publish architecture books? What is your goal with publishing books on architecture?

Editorial Gustavo Gili is a hundred and ten-years-old independent publishing house that started publishing architecture books in the 1940s, mainly translations of German technical books, such as Architect’s Data by Ernst Neufert. In the 1960s we started to translate books on architectural history and theory, and from the 1980s monographs also in English. So firstly we publish architecture books to continue our own tradition; secondly, because in a way we hold a kind of responsibility to spread the architectural knowledge since we have translated (and continue translating) into Spanish the most important books of contemporary architecture thinking; thirdly, specially with our magazine 2G, because we believe that our experience can contribute to expand the discipline and discover new practices.

What are the differences between publishing architectural and other types of books?

The biggest differences are that the architectural graphic materials need a certain sensibility and know-how to present it to be readable. Also, the reader of architecture books is quite demanding in terms of graphic design.

How do you see the current state of affairs in architectural publishing?

Uncertain… Books compete now with other media for communicating information and knowledge on architecture.

What are you doing to address the changes to book publishing brought on by digital technologies?

Our magazine 2G has started a new paperless era—we only publish it in digital format and we are very excited of what it’s going to happen.
What are your top architecture titles in terms of sales and popularity?

The top three are Spanish translations of classical books: Architect’s Data, by Ernst Neufert; Modern Architecture. A Critical History, by Kenneth Frampton; and Delirious New York, by Rem Koolhaas.

What are new architecture titles you're most excited about, particularly ones that may be dealing with shifts in publishing?

The next two issues of our 2G magazine on the Belgian studio Architecten de Vylder Vinck Taillieu and the California architects Johnston Marklee.

 

Images Publishing


Mulgrave, VIC, Australia
Founded 1983
Q&A with Paul Latham, Publisher

Why do you publish architecture books? What is your goal with publishing books on architecture?
 
IMAGES has a passion for architecture and design and has been publishing this genre of books for nearly 30 years. While its goal is to make each book a commercial success, this is not always the driving force and at times can be altruistic in its publishing.
 
What are the differences between publishing architectural and other types of books?
 
The difference between publishing architecture and trade press is the intense attention to detail required making sure images portray exactly what the architect sees and wants. Color and cropping are essential to get right. In saying this, I rate publishing architecture as one of the most difficult forms of publishing.
 
How do you see the current state of affairs in architectural publishing?
 
Traditional print is competing to a certain extent with electronic publishing, which is changing the way people wish to view material. However in saying this and in my experience, the majority of architects still wish to sit down and look at drawings and images in printed form. They report this as a pleasurable experience, even citing at times the smell of the ink, whereas I've had reported that looking at computer images, whether on a tablet or a computer screen is not as rewarding as scanning a printed page.
 
What are you doing to address the changes to book publishing brought on by digital technologies?
 
IMAGES has embraced ebook publishing and as well as fixed page layouts is now attempting to add layers to its ebooks. The ebook revolution has not, at this stage, replaced the traditional book and I don't know whether it's just me, but I feel that when a person gets something on the Internet, they don't expect to pay very much if anything for it.  In short, while IMAGES is involved in the digital revolution, it will not be racing to publish digital material just for the sake of publishing it.

What are your top architecture titles in terms of sales and popularity?
 
Our top selling titles are about houses and house design. People still love to browse other people's work and the amount of twists and turns that architects can bring into a traditional family home always fascinates me. IMAGES top selling books are the "100 House" series, hotels and resorts, and apartments. In addition, there are certain architects published as monographs in the IMAGES stable who have been immensely popular worldwide. The most recent monograph featuring the work of Soo Khian from SCDA Architects in Singapore has had very strong sales.
 
What are new architecture titles you're most excited about, particularly ones that may be dealing with shifts in publishing?
 
The titles I am most excited about are currently in production and until published are best kept as a surprise. Publishing as you know doubt are aware is a very competitive business and every publisher wishes to be the first with a new title. IMAGES has several fantastic surprises for the market in the next 12 months.

 

Lars Müller Publishers


Zürich
Founded 1983
Q&A with Lars Müller, Publisher

Why do you publish architecture books? What is your goal with publishing books on architecture?

We don’t publish architecture books only, but also books on design, photography, art, and society. We make architecture books primarily out of personal interest, and also because architecture is a relatively stable segment in publishing from a sales point of view. We are convinced that architecture forms a significant aspect of contemporary culture in terms of its aesthetic, social, and economic dimensions. Therefore, our goal is to make these contents available to a broader audience and to encourage a critical, well-informed discourse on current developments in architecture and urbanism.
What are the differences between publishing architectural and other types of books?

Traditionally, architectural publishing requests a high standard of critical intellectual reflection, while other disciplines such as design, art and photography are likely to embrace a more basic visual documentation.

How do you see the current state of affairs in architectural publishing?

As in all fields of publishing, there is an inflation of often self-referential coffee table books celebrating star architects and their buildings, which deflect from the more sophisticated reflections within the discipline.

What are you doing to address the changes to book publishing brought on by digital technologies?

We are trying to radicalize the book in terms of editorial concept and editorial care as well as the book as a physical object, which deserves to be noticed and appreciated by an attentive and genuinely interested audience.  It is essential for us to decide on content that depends on being presented in book form and would clearly suffer from the technical limits imposed by digital media.
What are your top architecture titles in terms of sales and popularity?

Torre David, Ecological Urbanism, Sou Fujimoto’s Sketchbook

What are new titles you're most excited about, particularly ones that may be dealing with shifts in publishing?

There are two books I’d like to mention here. Wang Shu – Imagining the House is a facsimile of the architect’s original drawings, using tangible uncoated paper, generous foldout pages and a Japanese binding. This publication is a radicalization of the book in terms of the search for the appropriate physical presentation of the content. The second book is Poemotion by the Japanese artist Takahiro Kurashima. It consists of a series of abstract graphical patterns, which are set in motion as the reader moves the attached foil across them – as analog interaction. We are excited to present Poemotion 2 this autumn, which will be in color!

 

The MIT Press


Cambridge, MA
Founded 1962
Q&A with Roger Conover, Executive Editor

Why do you publish architecture books?
 
I don't qualify the books I publish as "architecture books" per se; I think the tendency to isolate any discourse within a category related to a professional discipline contributes to the marginalization of that discipline from the larger discourse and culture to which it belongs.
What is your goal with publishing books on architecture?
 
The same as with any books I publish: To introduce new voices, ideas and images that perplex and surprise, and texts that provoke questions and debate. 
 
What are the differences between publishing architectural and other types of books?
 
A greater inverse ratio between readers and buyers; more memorable images; fewer memorable sentences. 
 
How do you see the current state of affairs in architectural publishing?
 
Challenging and transitioning. But once again, I don't accept "architectural publishing" as a separate category of discursive production. That's part of the problem that produced the crisis that your questions are indirectly alluding to. 
 
What are you doing to address the changes to book publishing brought on by digital technologies?
 
Thinking about how to best serve different genres and uses of media: what it means to be a book, what it means to be an e-book, what kind of writing is best served by a journal or a blog, what it makes sense to read on paper, what is better suited to the screen or online platforms. 
What are your top architecture titles in terms of sales and popularity?

Currently, they are Asylum, by Chris Payne; and Urban Code: 100 Lessons for Understanding the City, by  Anne Mikoleit and Moritz Pürckhauer. Historically, they are Site Planning, by Kevin Lynch; and Learning from Las Vegas, by Robert Venturi, Denise Scott-Brown, Steven Izenour.

What are new architecture titles you're most excited about, particularly ones that may be dealing with shifts in publishing?

Bleak Houses, by Timothy Brittain-Catlin,  which will be published in Spring 2014; The Architecture of Error, by Francesca  Hughes, which will be published in Fall 2014. These titles bring to light views that are repressed and issues that remain uninterrogated, unscrutinzed, and unspoken in most architectural texts and professional exchanges—and yet these issues have everything to do with constituting architecture's cultural identities and social complexes. I am referring to such issues as error, regret, failure, and disappointment—which both of these books address in different ways. Despite the pervasiveness of these conditions, they rarely surface in public discussions or formal writing about architecture, where the heroic fictions of success, merit, and value dominate.

 

nai010 publishers


Rotterdam
Founded 1997
Q&A with Eelco van Welie, Director/Publisher

Why do you publish architecture books? What is your goal with publishing books on architecture?

As a not-for-profit architecture publisher, we publish to stimulate architectural discourse, critical reflection and public debate on architecture and the designed environment

What are the differences between publishing architectural and other types of books?

In architecture publishing, the design and format of the publication is an essential part of the content.

How do you see the current state of affairs in architectural publishing?

Both challenging and promising. In Europe, the building industry has taken quite a few blows from the current crisis, with architecture publishers like Actar and Birkhaüser severely hit and Phaidon and Thames & Hudson shifting focus to other fields of publishing. Also, architecture offices are looking to self-publishing as a means of disseminating their projects and ideas. On the other hand, there is a lot of interest in studies and surveys focusing on ways architecture can contribute to world problems like reuse, sustainability, energy, social issues and more.

What are you doing to address the changes to book publishing brought on by digital technologies?

Engage and build experience. Because of the above, we feel that the ebook reading experience, including the design of architecture ebooks, should bring added value to the architecture reader. So, apart from making our books available in fixed-formats, we experiment with from-scratch ebook designs in a variety of formats and platforms.
What are your top architecture titles in terms of sales and popularity?

Sweet&Salt: With New York Times’ Michael Kimmelman labeling S&S as "required reading," this "profoundly humanistic consideration of the culture of water" was, along with Rem Koolhaas’ Metabolism Talks, chosen as best book for 2012 by Architectural Record. With praise for its "beautifully printed" images and its offering of "a plethora of ideas" by designers about how to deal with water’s myriad challenges, S&S has clearly made the cut to many book budgets, and sales have been likewise.

How to Make a Japanese House: This book offers more than just a collection of projects. With a Dutch author who lives in Japan and essays by three Japanese writers, it is both sensitive to the Japanese architectural condition as it offers analysis from a non-Japanese position. Interviews pitch well known architects such as Kengo Kuma and Kazuyo Sejima against newcomers like Junya Ishigami and Ryuji Nakamura, laying bare the tradition of building the small Japanese house within three generations of Japanese architects.

What are new architecture titles you're most excited about, particularly ones that may be dealing with shifts in publishing?

Although not an ebook, I’m looking forward to MVRDV Buildings, a volume documenting the built work of the office since they amazed the world with their design of the Dutch pavilion at the 2000 World Expo. Incorporating experiences from the use of these often iconic buildings after completion, it includes feedback from users, students and visitors and the general public using social media.

 

Princeton Architectural Press


New York
Founded 1981
Q&A with Kevin Lippert, Publisher

Why do you publish architecture books? What is your goal with publishing books on architecture?

Although I did not end up as a practicing architect—almost certainly a good thing— my architecture-school education not only taught me to love books, but also to look at everything in our visual world as the outcome of a conscious design decision. Focusing the editorial lens of Princeton Architectural Press onto great architecture or even onto the most obscure corners of the world of architecture and design, and making a beautifully designed (and hopefully successful) book about it, one that “surprises and delights,” is really my goal for the press, and, I think, everybody who works here.

What are the differences between publishing architectural and other types of books?

Typically, our books are highly illustrated, often in four colors, and are aimed at a relatively narrow market. This combination of a small market with high production values pushes up prices on the kind of books we do and limits their profitability. A large trade publisher (for example, of popular fiction) can sell ten times the copies we can with manufacturing costs that are a fraction of what we pay, that’s certainly the biggest difference. Of course, this fosters a certain conservatism, publishers look for repeat successes that are quite like others that sold well, leading to a lot of “me-too” books and scaring them away from the kind of books we do.

How do you see the current state of affairs in architectural publishing?

Although it seems like a calm time, there is actually a lot of change in our business: big players who once dominated the field have lost their influence or, in a few cases, gone out of business, and former upstarts, like Princeton Architectural Press, have a much more prominent position in the field, including in areas once outside our normal field of play. Self-publishing, especially through high-quality print- on-demand services like Blurb and Lulu, is the big change looming. Projects with too small a market to justify through traditional publishing channels can still see the light of day, with good production values and widespread distribution. Increasingly, we see proposals put together using Blurb where we ask ourselves, "Do they really need us?" The book looks good and can be purchased on Amazon, which might be all that’s needed in many of these cases, although there are questions of design, marketing, and publicity that aren’t addressed in this scenario.
What are you doing to address the changes to book publishing brought on by digital technologies?

We are migrating as many of our books to electronic formats as possible, and now have several hundred available in PDF for academic libraries and students, and several dozen in Kindle and/or iBook, but none of these are ideal formats/platforms for our books, and the market is still quite small. We’ve seen some modest success with some of our predominantly textual books (like Instant, a history of the Polaroid), but even here sales of the electronic version are only a fraction of the hardcover. We still believe strongly that the printed book, which is a high-resolution, economically made and even recyclable, display device, is here to stay for the foreseeable future. We enjoy designing for the tactility of the book—from the materials (paper and cloth) to the typography and page layout—and our customers seem to appreciate this, so I don’t think what we do will be displaced by e-readers in the near future. As we get better at producing e-books, and bringing the same set of design concerns to their making, I hope that we’ll be able to create distinctive “look and feel” here that so many people tell me they find in our printed books. But, certainly for the moment, we see digital publishing as an add-on to our print program, and not a substitute: both-and, not either-or.

What are your top architecture titles in terms of sales and popularity?

Although you can find a list of our current bestsellers on our website, our bestselling titles historically are Rural Studio, The Green House, and Theorizing a New Agenda. I hope this says something, respectively, that we still believe architecture has the power to better the world, or improve our environment, and that people are still interested in thinking about architecture as much as they are making it. This said, we’ve also published very popular monographs on architects like Tom Kundig, Rick Joy, and Steven Holl, who are very much interested in the craft and materiality of building.

What are new architecture titles you're most excited about, particularly ones that may be dealing with shifts in publishing?

We have several projects in development where we plan a “simultaneous release” in several formats: a traditional printed book (possibly short-run digital), an e-book (Kindle), and PDF (for academic libraries), three small markets we hope add up to enough to make possible projects we couldn’t afford to pursue with just one of these channels. Our hope is that the investment we make in editing and design can be spread across three media to help us publish interesting books that, too often, we have to reject because the numbers don’t add up in a book-only model. To me, this is the real promise of the “changes to book publishing brought on by digital technologies” you allude to in your earlier question.

 


Lucerne
Founded 1999
Q&A with Heinz Wirz, Publisher

Why do you publish architecture books? What is your goal with publishing books on architecture?

We’re both excited and passionate about combining the profession of publishing, producing and selling books, with the theme of architecture and its presentation. It’s our aim to encourage the study of contemporary architecture. We believe it’s important that innovative buildings and architectural standpoints from different regions in Switzerland and Europe are published and documented. That strengthens the sustainable quality of architecture and preserves an important cultural heritage, which is especially relevant in a period when there is more construction than ever before.

What are the differences between publishing architectural and other types of books?

Unlike other types of books, we present texts, plans and photos in a balanced way to allow them to complement each other. That gives the material a more in-depth documentation. The reader can enjoy visualizing and checking the statements of the text by looking at the images. We’re convinced that analysis and increased insight into a building also enhances the enjoyment of the architecture. 

How do you see the current state of affairs in architectural publishing?

From our perspective, the market for architectural publications continues to be vibrant.

What are you doing to address the changes to book publishing brought on by digital technologies?

We’re publishing a few of our books as e-books as an initial experiment.
What are your top architecture titles in terms of sales and popularity?

Our most important publications are currently: Valerio Olgiati (monograph), Miroslav Šik (monograph) and Sergison Bates architects (monograph).

What are new architecture titles you're most excited about, particularly ones that may be dealing with shifts in publishing?

The Images of Architects (edited by Valerio Olgiati) is a volume that is very dear to us and will be published soon.

 


New York
Founded 1929
Q&A with David Morton, Associate Publisher for Architecture

Why do you publish architecture books? What is your goal with publishing books on architecture?
 
To help the interested public become aware of current trends, to make the most acknowledged and respected architecture available to a wide audience.
 
What are the differences between publishing architectural and other types of books?

Architecture books have a technical aspect about them that most other books do not have. Most architecture books have drawings, which can be as basic as presentation drawings, which show a building in a relatively realistic way and are usually made for clients who sometimes are not familiar with reading architectural drawings. Other drawings include simple floor plans, site plans and elevations, or  more complex drawings, which are usually only for professional use, such as a cross sections, or even more complex ones such as isometric and axonometric projections. Each kind of drawing has specific use. In addition, parts of working drawings, which are actually used on site to construct a building, are also sometimes shown, as are complex engineering drawings, particularly when dealing with structural elements of  tall  buildings or other innovative structures.
 
How do you see the current state of affairs in architectural publishing?
 
Book publishing is slightly diminished now due to the plethora of material on the Internet.
 
What are you doing to address the changes to book publishing brought on by digital technologies?
 
Rizzoli has accommodated itself well to new digital technologies. The kinds of books Rizzoli publishes have not changed with digital technology; only the method of producing them has changed. All Rizzoli books are now designed digitally and proofed digitally. As well, Rizzoli is now publishing e-books.

What are your top architecture titles in terms of sales and popularity?
 
Numerous books on Frank Lloyd Wright, Frank Gehry, Tadao Ando, Richard Meier, I.M. Pei, and Thom Mayne (Morphosis).
 
What are new architecture titles you're most excited about, particularly ones that may be dealing with shifts in publishing?
 
Bernard Tschumi: Architecture Concepts, Red is not a Color (2012) interweaves architectural theory, practice, and hypothetical projects with recently-built projects in 776 pages that progress in an innovative manner somewhat similar to that of a film script.

 


London
Founded 1851
Q&A with Wendy Fuller, Editor, Architecture

Why do you publish architecture books? What is your goal with publishing books on architecture?

Routledge prides itself on publishing not only a wide range of topics, but in-depth on each topic. Architecture is a complicated field that is at once generalist and specialist and it affects and is affected by many other disciplines (construction, landscape architecture, urban design, planning, engineering, etc.). We see a need for books with high-production values that speak to the technical and theoretical aspects of building. Our goal is to find individuals who have found solutions or strategies and ask them to write books full of content that students and professionals will be both inspired by and able to apply to their work.
What are the differences between publishing architectural and other types of books?

The importance of the images. Visual literacy is key to architects, and sometimes the only way to get the information about buildings that they need is to read the plan, sections, and perspectival images. The images in many cases are the central focus of the book, and the text is there to explain what can’t be read in the images.

How do you see the current state of affairs in architectural publishing?

It’s a tough time to specialize in architecture. Production costs for high-quality, four-color books haven’t gone down, but market conditions are tough, so in many cases, especially for very specialized projects with small audiences, it can be difficult to find a publishing model that works. Also, architects expect to pay prices that are more in line with books with much higher print runs by publishers producing mainstream books for a general audience. This can make it incredibly difficult to make money on professional architecture books. Routledge is in a fortunate position because the breadth of our overall portfolio and our operation makes it possible for us to publish in some areas that would simply not be viable for smaller publishers.

What are you doing to address the changes to book publishing brought on by digital technologies?

We have a dedicated digital development team at Routledge who are testing both established and emerging technologies to ensure we are prepared for transitions in the market. We also have an e-book for nearly every book we publish, and wherever possible we aim to publish e-books simultaneously with our print books. As a company we’ve already published interactive e-books in some subject areas. At the moment in architecture though, because our book designs are so important to the content, our e-books are in most cases straight duplicates of the print books. For some of our textbooks we also have companion websites with additional content for students and instructors.
What are your top architecture titles in terms of sales and popularity?

We’re a global publisher, so our top three globally are: Architect's Pocket Book, 4th Edition by Ann Ross and Jonathan Hetreed, published in February 2011; Metric Handbook: Planning and Design Data, 4th Edition, by David Littlefield, published in March, 2012; Analysing Architecture, 3rd Edition, by Simon Unwin, published in January 2009.

Our three top sellers in North America are: Analysing Architecture, 3rd Edition, by Simon Unwin, published in January 2009; The Green Studio Handbook, 2nd Edition, by Alison Kwok and Walter Grondzik, published in March, 2011; The Structural Basis of Architecture, 2nd Edition, by Bjorn N. Sandaker, Arne P. Eggen, and Mark R. Cruvellier, published in April 2011.

What are new architecture titles you're most excited about, particularly ones that may be dealing with shifts in publishing?

Graphic Design for Architects by Karen Lewis, to be published towards the end of 2013. This is a fantastically rich book which will provide its audience with exactly the information they need  from portfolio design and competition boards, to signage and building super-graphics – to address every stage of the reader’s architectural career.

Skins, Envelopes, and Enclosures: Concepts for Designing Building Exteriors, by Mayine Yu, to be published in September 2013. We’re very excited about the depth and quality of the information in this book. It will be a useful resource for students and professionals alike, and it's written by a practicing architect who is an expert on the topic.


Email interviews conducted by John Hill